Engineering

Beginner’s Guide to Search Engine Optimization

Search Engine Optimization, also known as SEO, is the art and science of making web pages attractive to the search engines. The better optimized the page is, the higher a ranking it will achieve in search engine result listings. This is especially critical because most people who use search engines only look at the first page or two of the search results, so for a page to get high traffic from a search engine, it has to be listed in those first two or three pages.

In short, Search engine optimization is the process of increasing the amount of visitors to a Web site by ranking high in the search results of a search engine. The higher a Web site ranks in the results of a search, the greater the chance that that site will be visited by a user. It is common practice for Internet users to not click through pages and pages of search results. Search engine optimization (SEO) helps to ensure that a site is accessible to a search engine and improves the chances that the site will be found by the search engine.

Search engine optimization is the practice of guiding the development or redevelopment of a website so that it will naturally attract visitors by winning top ranking on the major search engines for selected search terms and phrases.

Search engine optimization is the adjustment of html page entities and content for the express purpose of ranking higher on search engines. Search engine optimization is the skill of designing or re-designing a website in order to improve the search engine ranking of that website for certain relevant keywords.

How do Search Engines Work?

In order to use Search Engine Optimization one must know full functionality of Search Engines. The working is as follows:

Search Engines for the general web do not really search the World Wide Web directly. Each one search a database of the full text of web pages selected from the billions of web pages out there residing on servers. When you search the web using a search engine, you are always searching a somewhat stale copy of the real web page. When you click on links provided in search engine search results, you retrieve from the server the current version of the page. Search engine databases are selected and built by computer robot programs called spiders.

Although it is said they “crawl” the web in their hunt for pages to include, in truth they stay in one place. They find the pages for potential inclusion by following the links in the pages they already have in their database (i.e., already know). They cannot think or type a URL or use judgment to decide to go look something up and see what’s on the web about it. Computers are getting more sophisticated all the time, but they are still brainless. If a web page is never linked to in any other page, search engine spider’s cannot find it. The only way a brand new page – one that no other page has ever linked to – can get into a search engine is for its URL to be sent by some human to the search engine companies as a request that the new page be included. All search engine companies offer ways to do this.

After spiders find pages, they pass them on to another computer program for indexing. This program identifies the text, links, and other content in the page and stores it in the search engine database’s files so that the database can be searched by keyword and whatever more advanced approaches are offered, and the page will be found if your search matches its content.

Some types of pages and links are excluded from most search engines by policy. Others are excluded because search engine spiders cannot accesses them. Pages that are excluded are referred to as the Invisible Web. The Invisible Web is estimated to be two to three or more times bigger than the visible web.

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